Monthly Archives: August 2013

EN Super Fan

Meet Mr. Munoz, ENHS Band Director and ENSC Teacher of the Year. Dedicated, committed, inspiring, great role model for our students, and just plain fun to be around!

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ENSC Curriculum Newsletter

Check out the fall edition of the East Noble School Corporation Curriculum Newsletter prepared by Assistant Superintendent Becca Lamon.  http://tinyurl.com/pzc3zn5

This newsletter is prepared to better inform the ENSC community of curriculum and instruction in our district.  This informative newsletter will be published twice per year. 

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School Grades

Last year, East Noble School Corporation received their district grade along with a grade for each of its school buildings. This year, what will the grade be and is there any valid data that can be used to calculate that grade? State Superintendent Ritz along with some legislators are wanting the current grading system to change. In fact, the school grades for 2012-2013 have been delayed until sometime in November. There has been much controversy over school grades since former State Superintendent Tony Bennett was allegedly involved in altering the school grading system to improve the grade of a charter school.

Do you understand the grading system? Do you know how an “A,” “B,” C,” or any of the other grades are calculated? Some believe it is how well our students perform on the ISTEP test. Well, there is much more to the grade than that. Do you know there are bonus and penalty points? Do you know that our students who are the most challenged special education students count against our graduation rate which affects the school grade? Do you know that a non-English speaking student new to the country does not have to take the language arts test, but they do have to take the math test that has multiple story problems that need to be read? Do you know that a district is expected to teach a non-English speaking student the English language in one year! They are exempt from the language arts test during just their first year to the country. Do you now that the state measures language arts growth of a sophomore student by comparing the 8th grade ISTEP test produced by CTB/McGraw Hill to an 10th grade English test produced by Questar. Two different tests and two different companies

The grade is calculated in part using the ISTEP test scores and other elements included. Those elements are performance, improvement, year-to-year growth in individual student learning compared to other students in the state, closing achievement gaps, graduation rates, and opportunities for students to gain an early advantage on college and careers (advanced placement, dual college credits, and certifications). Schools earn points for each of these areas and also bonus or penalty points. For additional information on the grading system, go to this PowerPoint presentation prepared by Assistant Superintendent Becca Lamon: School Grading A-F Model

I told the 2013 East Noble Academy members last week that I would put ENSC against any other district in our area. We are focused on doing what is best for the individual student and ensuring they have the needed skills, experiences, and exposure outside of the school walls that address the “whole” child and not just mathematics and language arts. Obviously, math and English are critical to a student’s success. Math and English are the foundation skills that direct and can dictate a child’s future. However, only focusing on math and English creates a very narrow perspective for our students and inhibits their ability to effectively choose the direction of their future. While there is room for improvement, our school grades certainly do not reflect the true quality of instruction and student achievement that is occurring daily in our buildings.

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Anonymous Bullying Reporting

ENSC has established anonymous bullying tip lines for each of their buildings.   We always recommend a student tell an administrator, teacher, or adult in the building of a bullying issue and if he/she is not comfortable doing that, parents are encouraged to get involved and contact their child’s school.  If this is still not an option, bullying can be reported by telephone or email to anonymous bullying tip lines at each of the ENSC buildings.  

To anonymously report a bullying issue using the telephone, call 260-347-5512.  When prompted, select one of the following building numbers and then leave your message.

1-Avilla Elementary
2-East Noble High School
3-East Noble Middle School
4-North Side Elementary
5-Rome City Elementary
6-South Side Elementary
7-Wayne Center Elementary
8-Alternative Learning Center

If you prefer to report using email, use the following email addresses

Avilla Elementary:  av-bully@eastnoble.net
ENHS:  hs-bully@eastnoble.net
ENMS:  ms-bully@eastnoble.net
North Side Elementary:  ns-bully@eastnoble.net
Rome City Elementary:  rc-bully@eastnoble.net
South Side Elementary:  ss-bully@eastnoble.net
Wayne Center Elementary:  wc-bully@eastnoble.net
Alternative Learning Center: as-bully@eastnoble.net

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An East Noble High School Hero

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Today’s post is about an ENHS Hero, Kevin Williams.  The ENHS athletic director, Rief Gilg, says it best in his daily notes.  Below are his words and post:

I first became acquainted with Kevin last football season, when he was lying on the turf waiting for an ambulance.  He had been blindsided on a play and had been hurt pretty bad; I recall being very impressed at the courage he showed that night.  Little did I know that the courage he displayed was a harbinger of an even more impressive act.  Kevin, a sophomore, helped a young boy out of a burning building on Monday night, injuring himself in the process of breaking out some windows with his bare hands to free a 4 year old neighbor from a room he had locked himself in.

As per wane.com, Kevin had this to say:

“I did what had to be done,” Williams said. “I had to help him out and with him being my little buddy, it meant so much more, like I was pulling out a family member.”

One thing that people do entirely too much in sports is talk about heroes.  Being a hero because you can run fast, catch a ball, or put a ball in a hoop? In reality, not so much. This, folks, is the real deal.  Doing something not because it is easy, but because it is right.  One of the cornerstones of our program is selfless service to others; caring more about someone else than we do ourselves.  The ultimate service to another is saving a life, and Kevin didn’t hesitate a bit to put himself in danger to do that.

As the parent of a 4 year old, I’m not sure that even Kevin knows the level of service he provided for the young boy’s parents, but Kevin, take it from me: I have no doubt you will do great things with your life, but you will never do anything that is any more meaningful than you did Monday night.

Being a hero is often defined as an ordinary person doing something extraordinary.  There is absolutely no doubt that Kevin did something extraordinary; as for being an ordinary person, I respectfully disagree.  Kevin Williams is a lot of things; ordinary isn’t one of them.  Come to think of it, none of our kids are normal; they are East Noble Knights; thank you so much Kevin for who you are, what you did, and for the example you have given all of us!

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